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By Ron McVan

The 14 note Press crew brings dynamic Wotanist artwork, background and idea to Wotansvolk around the world. This collaboration bargains a wealth of amassed gnostic teachings, non secular concentration and ancestral satisfaction, a folkish direction for this day and destiny generations. The consummate consultant booklet for the Euro-ethnic pagan.

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Texts exalt him as the governor of light and wis­ dom. His titles designate him as the "wanderer", "the liv­ ing father", "uncle" or "the old one". Importance of the goddess of fertility and fecundity in the ancient scheme is perhaps indicated by her identification under more than forty different titles which describe her numerous attributes in various localities and periods. As Nintud, she is the virgin goddess of procreation and fecundity, sometimes called Makh, "the supreme god­ dess", and known to the Babylonians and Assyrians as Belit-itani, "queen of the gods".

The Persians believed leprosy to be an affliction of those who had committed some offense against the moon. 27 The Japanese sacred festivals are held at certain seasons of the year and at changes of the moon. According to Plu­ tarch, carpenters in the first century rejected timber fallen 21-Jivanji Jamshedji Modi, The Ancient: Iranian Belief and Folk· lore of the Moon, The Anthropological Society o f Bombay, 1917, v. 11, pp. 14-39. 22-Moon Lore, p. 131. 23-Moon Lore, p. 214. 24-Symbolism of the East and West, p.

8 : 1 ,2 ) . The Persians believed leprosy to be an affliction of those who had committed some offense against the moon. 27 The Japanese sacred festivals are held at certain seasons of the year and at changes of the moon. According to Plu­ tarch, carpenters in the first century rejected timber fallen 21-Jivanji Jamshedji Modi, The Ancient: Iranian Belief and Folk· lore of the Moon, The Anthropological Society o f Bombay, 1917, v. 11, pp. 14-39. 22-Moon Lore, p. 131. 23-Moon Lore, p. 214. 24-Symbolism of the East and West, p.

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